ilovecharts:

The Key to Success Will Be Announced Shortly. Please Stand By.

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”
– Bill Cosby

This week, Maggie illustrates a quote from Neil deGrasse Tyson

ilovecharts:

The Key to Success Will Be Announced Shortly. Please Stand By.

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”

– Bill Cosby

This week, Maggie illustrates a quote from Neil deGrasse Tyson

826 notes

kevinbolk:

A philosophy I very much live my life by.

kevinbolk:

A philosophy I very much live my life by.

36,079 notes

Stop setting yourself

on fire for someone who

stays to watch you burn.

Haiku on Perspective (via fawun)

(Source: connotativewords)

242,115 notes

Speaking is not an act of extraversion,” observes Malcolm Gladwell, another introverted writer who spends plenty of time on stage. “It has nothing to do with extraversion. It’s a performance, and many performers are hugely introverted.

24 notes

chels:

fastcodesign:

An Artist Creates A Story Out Of New York’s Endless Snow

Jackson wrote the short story in full before the sky began to dump and is currently a third of the way finished. The first sentence reads: “To approach snow too closely is to forget what it is,” said the girl who cried snowflakes.

As someone who writes in the snow often, I appreciate the difficulty of this project. I wonder how she does it? It looks like she must be using a paintbrush and boiling water. The lettering is so perfect. 

711 notes

parislemon:

abstractgraphdesigns:

Wisdom

Basically every comment section on the internet.

parislemon:

abstractgraphdesigns:

Wisdom

Basically every comment section on the internet.

8,290 notes

Speaking is not an act of extraversion,” observes Malcolm Gladwell, another introverted writer who spends plenty of time on stage. “It has nothing to do with extraversion. It’s a performance, and many performers are hugely introverted.

24 notes

  1. Give respect: the respect we want.
  2. Take less, give more.
  3. Others don’t have to lose for us to win.
  4. Better, not more.
  5. Keep it simple, keep it honest.

Om Malik shares the values that built GigaOm over the past seven years as he moves on to his next chapter.

It’s heartening to see that those of us who aspire to produce quality signal amidst a world of noise share a similar underlying set of motives – here are 7 things I learned myself in 7 years of building Brain Pickings.

(via explore-blog)

408 notes

shortformblog:

Michael Sam’s decision to open up about his sexuality has generated quite a bit of discussion among sports fans and broadcasters alike this week, but few have offered thoughts as on-the-nose as this two-minute segment from Dale Hansen, sports analyst for Dallas’ WFAA 8 News. If a league worth billions welcomes the founders of dog-fighting rings, drunk drivers, accused rapists, and a whole lot more, it seems pretty disgusting to suggest that a gay man would be the only one who isn’t welcome in an NFL locker room. source

228 notes

Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that.

Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

Reblogging again for that paragraph because that is the part we forget the most.

(via girlwiki)

(Source: sendforbromina)

45,034 notes